Tymek Borowski

BORN 1984, Warszawa

Taking surrealist poetics as his point of departure, Tymek Borowski tests the possibilities of the medium of the painting by “pushing” it to the limits of the canvas, the pigments, and the stretcher. At the same time, he plays with the figure of the contemporary artist and the rules governing the world of art and culture. Borowski holds a degree in painting, earned in Prof. Leon Tarasewicz’s studio at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts. Besides painting, he also practices photography, music, and video and collaborates with Paweł Śliwiński.

untitled
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Tymek Borowski

untitled

2008 / oil, acrylic, canvas / 120 x 110 cm / no. 0086 Creative CommonsCreative CommonsCreative Commons Licence 3.0 1/ 2 Wróć
Description

“I guess these days if you paint figuratively and the paintings aren’t realistic and have a strange mood, then you automatically get categorised under ‘surrealism.’ I think the term makes sense (…) This is art that is not entangled in any contexts, not to be read in any way (…) These paintings don’t inscribe themselves into any discourse, don’t surrender to any standard art-analysing device,” says Tymek Borowski in an interview for artbazaar.blogspot.com. The painting in the Foundation’s collection conveys a sense of unease. Unable to follow a path offered by the title, the viewer can only surrender to the swirl of the brush interrupted by the vertical paint trickles.

untitled (Satan)
This image, entitled Sharing Creative Works, by Creative Commons is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Tymek Borowski

untitled (Satan)

2008 / oil, acrylic, canvas / 60 x 50 cm / no. 0087 Creative CommonsCreative CommonsCreative Commons Licence 3.0 2/ 2 Wróć
Description

In the painting, we see what appears to be an outline of a mountain landscape fit into a larger picture. From the side of the “proper” image, forms of various shapes – round, flowing, cutting sharply across – are pressing against it.  These elements define the piece’s dynamics, while playing a game with the viewer’s aesthetic habits. Formally, Untitled does not differ fundamentally from the artist's other paintings. Yet, as Borowski says, it has been significantly more popular. What is the source of its allure and magnetism? The painter claims that the piece works like a visualisation of evil, imperceptibly fascinating and attractive – hence the work's subtitle.

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