Grzeszykowska / Smaga

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Aneta Grzeszykowska works with photographs as one would with an archive. Her projects, chiefly photographic ones, are never simple sequences, but rather advanced manipulations in art history and ontology. She parodies classic photographic series, such as Cindy Sherman’s Untitled Film Stills, merges images to create portraits of nonexistent people (Portraits, 2006), and collects family photographs to then erase her own image from them (Album, 2005). She also explores the themes of corporeality, visibility, and invisibility in cinematic pieces. She holds a graphic arts degree from the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts. Since 1999, she has collaborated with Jan Smaga. Her works have been shown at the Berlin Biennale (2006) and the Heidelberger Kunstverein (2010).

Jan Smaga is not only a photographer but also a creative explorer of the photographic medium itself. He stresses the medium’s conventional and flexible nature, sometimes treating it in the classic manner and sometimes opting for a more creative approach, that utilises digital montage. How does three-dimensionality, of architecture in particular, translate into the flat photographic image? Smaga ponders this question and others in his work. At the same time, his compositions are formally perfect. Working in a duo with Aneta Grzeszykowska, the artist has developed an interesting technique, based on digital manipulations, which makes his photographs look like scanned pictures (Plans, 2001-2003, YMCA, 2005). From 1994-1999, Smaga studied at the Faculty of Graphic Arts, Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.

Plac Inwalidów
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Grzeszykowska / Smaga

Plac Inwalidów

2003 / c-print, pleksi / 210 x 155 cm / no. 0076    Wróć
Description

The photograph comes from the 10-piece series Plans that was Grzeszykowska’s joint project with Jan Smaga. Although they appear to be integral images, horizontal sections of apartments, they were in fact created by digitally merging hundreds of fragmentary images. The rendition is so perfect one gets the impression of looking at a scanned image. This sociological project shows the modern apartment, on one hand, as a claustrophobic space based on a repetitive module, and on the other, as a highly intimate and personalised area of daily activities.

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