Katarzyna Przezwańska

BORN 1984, Warszawa

Katarzyna Przezwańska was born in 1984 in Warsaw, where she lives and works. She references Modernism in a way that has never been seen before in Polish art. In contrast to the Polish artists who debuted around the year 2000, Przezwańska’s Modernism is no longer an aesthetic fetishism, the picturesque ruins of a fallen utopia, or a sentimental journey to the concrete-gray lands of her childhood years. It is the exact opposition: her work alludes to Modernism in its heroic period, still filled with optimism, hope and... bright colors. In this regard, it extends to architecture focused on the individual, adapted to his/her personal needs, and laying claim to totality. Przezwańska’s interventions and spatial projects are an attempt to recapture some of its ideas for contemporary times. Constructing multicolored, strongly individualized spaces, details and objects, Przezwańska, with her tongue firmly in her cheek, convinces us that what was truly revolutionary in Modernism can be quickly replaced. Modernity is our antiquity, because we have warped its original nature: colorful facades, multicolored walls and ceilings of private homes, rainbow-colored ornaments on public buildings and their surroundings, furniture tailored to the owner’s needs... For those who were brought up in the raw, concrete Modernist environment of the Communist Poland, doesn’t this sound like... a utopia? Przezwańska’s work allows us to view the spot where the Polish public space has found itself from a distance.

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This image, entitled Sharing Creative Works, by Creative Commons is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Katarzyna Przezwańska

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2015 / acrylic paint, glazing varnish, MDF / 72 x 72 cm / no. 0149 Creative CommonsCreative CommonsCreative Commons Licence 1/ 3 Wróć
Description

Katarzyna Przezwańska's works in the foundation's collections mark a visible turning point in her artistic career. The sculptures, installations, and architectural installations with which she had previously been associated fade into the background. Przezwańska returns to painting, which she originally studied. The pictures are made on MDF. Using unusual materials, such as polyurethane varnish and glaze, she poses questions about what forms contemporary painting can take, and if it still makes sense to pursue it in our era of swift cultural and social change. These works can also be interpreted in the spirit of post-Internet art – they are “art after technology.” Traditional techniques are disappearing, and the source of these pictures is an aesthetic of graphics programs. At the same time, this series of pictures, like all of Przezwańska's work, alludes to Modernist tradition, in this case, particularly to American Minimalists and the Polish interwar avant-garde. Apart from everything, the artist's overriding goal is for her works to bring the viewer aesthetic pleasure. She does not see this as a source of shame or a side effect. It is an aim unto itself.

untitled
This image, entitled Sharing Creative Works, by Creative Commons is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Katarzyna Przezwańska

untitled

2015 / stainless steel, glazing varnish, MDF / 72 x 72 cm / no. 0150 Creative CommonsCreative CommonsCreative Commons Licence 2/ 3 Wróć
Description

Katarzyna Przezwańska's works in the foundation's collections mark a visible turning point in her artistic career. The sculptures, installations, and architectural installations with which she had previously been associated fade into the background. Przezwańska returns to painting, which she originally studied. The pictures are made on MDF. Using unusual materials, such as polyurethane varnish and glaze, she poses questions about what forms contemporary painting can take, and if it still makes sense to pursue it in our era of swift cultural and social change. These works can also be interpreted in the spirit of post-Internet art – they are “art after technology.” Traditional techniques are disappearing, and the source of these pictures is an aesthetic of graphics programs. At the same time, this series of pictures, like all of Przezwańska's work, alludes to Modernist tradition, in this case, particularly to American Minimalists and the Polish interwar avant-garde. Apart from everything, the artist's overriding goal is for her works to bring the viewer aesthetic pleasure. She does not see this as a source of shame or a side effect. It is an aim unto itself.

Early Polishness
This image, entitled Sharing Creative Works, by Creative Commons is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Katarzyna Przezwańska

Early Polishness

2017 / artificial material, paper / 130 x 159 x 318 cm / no. 0169 Creative CommonsCreative CommonsCreative Commons Licence 3.0 3/ 3 Wróć
Description

Not more than a few hundred million years ago, Warsaw ran riot with plants that looked like palm trees. These were far superior to the one standing at de Gaulle Roundabout, because they were living. Our capital city was much closer to the equator, and where it was not covered by the seas, there grew a subtropical forest. This forest was populated by animal life, including dinosaurs. In short, the Polish capital was better off before Poland existed.

This model shows a panorama of the area of today’s Warsaw 200 million years ago. At that time, a subtropical climate reigned at our latitude. The sandy and swampy terrain was covered in coniferous trees, tree ferns, cycadales, gingkos, bennettitales, snake grass, and ferns. These were inhabited by small Composognathus dinosaurs and dragonflies, and footprints of larger dinosaurs were visible in the sand.

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